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 Response Page - Stratasys Ltd.  Interview -      
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These comments are responses to the statements listed below,
which were generated in regard to the
Stratasys Ltd.  Interview of
09-20-2013.
 

Eden Prairie firm: Minnesota can be a leader in new manufacturing technology

                                                                                                   OVERVIEW

Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a very disruptive technology, similar to the early widespread use of computers in the 1980s, say Stratasys, Ltd., executives Jim Bartel, Jon Cobb, Jeff DeGrange and Sharon Steinhoff Smith. Stratasys is a fast-growing, Eden Prairie-based 3D printing company, doing both design and manufacturing of 3D printers, as well as production of low-volume, end-use parts through 3D printing. The products are used for a variety of purposes and industries, including those in the medical field.

Bartel notes that it's a very competitive environment to find people with the skills the company needs. Cobb says the most effective way for government to support the growth of the 3D industry is to fund training in the needed skills as part of the curriculum in high schools and postsecondary institutions. He says elementary and middle school is not too early to introduce some elements of technical and scientific thinking that would prepare students to learn these skills. Cobb says the investment in education would do more to improve Minnesota's competitiveness than spending public money on incentives to attract or keep businesses in various cities in the state.

Cobb says important reasons Stratasys is located in Eden Prairie is that the company started in an incubator corridor in Eden Prairie and that the city has a core of high-tech companies. Smith notes, too, that the company has a large core of very good, long-tenure employees, many of whom live in Eden Prairie or in nearby suburbs.

De Grange says Minnesota, and the U.S. as a whole, could learn from two models, one in Germany and one in Ohio. The German model of teaching applied science requires students to rotate between time in industry and time in school. When the students graduate from university, they are ready to apply what they've learned to various industries. And Ohio has a multidimensional initiative called Ohio Third Frontier that aims to make Ohio the country's largest manufacturing state.

For the complete interview summary see:  Stratasys interview

Response Summary: Average response ratings shown below are simply the mean of all readers’ zero-to-ten responses to the ideas proposed and should not be considered an accurate reflection of a scientifically structured poll.

Readers were asked to rank the following on a scale of 0-10 ("not at all important" to "very important").

1. Value of topic. (8.5 average response) How useful to you is today's interview?  

2. Value of further study. (7.0 average response) How would you rank the importance of scheduling additional interviews on this topic?

Readers were asked to rate, on a scale of (0) most disagreement, to (5) neutral, to (10) most agreement, the following points made during the discussion.

3. Process could transform manufacturing. (8.5 average response) An innovative process by which products can be made using three-dimensional (3D) printing has potential to revolutionize traditional manufacturing.

4. 3D industry good for MN. (9.1 average response) The state of Minnesota is fortunate to have a well-established, fast-growing, 3D industry here.

5. 3D center would increase potential. (8.3 average response) The potential for 3D printing would increase greatly if business, non-profits, and governmental entities in Minnesota were work with a national group to establish an innovative 3D technology center, similar to such a center in Youngstown, OH.

6. Schools should offer CAD/3D training. (8.0 average response) High schools and post-secondary schools in Minnesota should acquaint students with 3D and offer more training in computer-assisted design (CAD) and 3D printing.

Response Distribution:

Not at all

Slightly

Neutral

Moderately

Very

Total Responses

1. Usefulness of topic.

0%

0%

7%

53%

40%

15

2. Importance of further study.

0%

13%

0%

67%

20%

15

 

Strongly disagree

Moderately disagree

Neutral

Moderately agree

Strongly agree

Total Responses

1. Value of topic.

0%

0%

7%

53%

40%

15

2. Value of further study.

0%

13%

0%

67%

20%

15

3. Process could transform manufacturing.

0%

0%

13%

40%

47%

15

4. 3D industry good for MN.

0%

0%

7%

33%

60%

15

5. 3D center would increase potential.

0%

0%

13%

60%

27%

15

6. Schools should offer CAD/3D training.

0%

7%

7%

57%

29%

14

Individual Responses:

Dave Broden  (10)  (10)  (10)  (10)  (10)  (10)

1. Value of topic. A very well stated and expressed understanding of the status and application of 3-D printing and how it will transform segments of the manufacturing segment of the economy

2. Value of further study. As we look at the competitive picture we should seek to understand how various industries are adapting disruptive technologies to remain competitive in the global market place.

3. Process could transform manufacturing. This innovation and its impact is evolving in industries of all sectors and will continue to grow. The 3-D process will evolve to new materials and capabilities that will be of interest to other industries.

4. 3D industry good for MN. The innovative atmosphere and capability of Minnesota high tech core business is such that it promotes the creation of companies with innovative technology as demonstrated by Stratasys.

5. 3D center would increase potential. National centers of excellence have had impact on economies of local areas as well as providing national advantages and opportunities. Minnesota is well positioned and has the capability to be a center of excellence for 3D printing if and only if there is some form of Minnesota leadership interest.

6. Schools should offer CAD/3D training. The evolving 3D capability and the lower cost is [makes it feasible to] show student the opportunities for innovation etc. This is only one of many new resources that should be applied as we bring ‘doing’ and ‘building’ experiences back into education.

Ray Ayotte  (7.5)  (2.5)  (10)  (10)  (10)  (10)

Anonymous    (10)  (10)  (5)  (5)  (5)  (5)

3. Process could transform manufacturing. I believe the speaker believes this, but I do not know enough to know the extent to which he may be right.

4. 3D industry good for MN. See comment for #3

5. 3D center would increase potential. See comment for #3

6. Schools should offer CAD/3D training. See comment for #3

Dennis L. Johnson  (10)  (7.5)  (10)  (7.5)  (7.5)  (10)

6. Schools should offer CAD/3D training. The Civic Caucus should keep an eye on this technology. It has a big future in manufacturing. It will increase demand for high-tech jobs but reduce demand for blue collar manufacturing jobs.

Don Anderson  (5)  (2.5)  (5)  (7.5)  (5)  (7.5)

David Dillon  (10)  (10)  (10)  (10)  (10)  (2.5)

1. Value of topic. Great to see investigation and discussion of Minnesota entrepreneurship.

Wayne Jennings   (7)  (7)  (9)  (10)  (9)  (10)

Mina Harrigan   (10)  (7)  (8)  (10)  (8)  (8)

Richard McGuire   (8)  (8)  (10)  (10)  (8)  (8)

Carolyn Ring   (7)  (7)  (8)  (10)  (8)  (na)

This again points out the necessity of business/industry and institutions of learning working together to educate for the needs of employers.  Interesting, they are "located" in Israel to avoid our high taxes.

Tom Spitznagle   (10)  (7)  (10)  (10)  (10)  (8)

Companies like Stratasys are what make America great – as opposed to government interference in the free market.

Jack Evert   (9)  (6)  (10)  (10)  (9)  (8)

This [is] a transformational technology that we can only guess as to its ultimate impact on American manufacturing.  We [dare not] assume that it is not going to be important and not give it the support and attention needed to make Minnesota a center for such manufacturing and process/equipment development.

Chuck Lutz   (8)  (6)  (7)  (9)  (8)  (9)

Paul and Ruth Hauge   (7)  (7)  (7)  (9)  (8)  (8)

Lyall Schwarzkopf   (9)  (8)  (8)  (8)  (9)  (8)

    

The Civic Caucus   is a non-partisan, tax-exempt educational organization.   The Core participants include persons of varying political persuasions,
reflecting years of leadership in politics and business. Click here  to see a short personal background of each.

   David Broden,  Janis Clay,  Bill Frenzel,  Paul Gilje,   Jan Hively,  Dan Loritz (Chair),  Marina Lyon,  Joe Mansky, 
Tim McDonald,  John Mooty,  Jim Olson,  Wayne Popham  and Bob White


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Dan Loritz, chair, 612-791-1919   ~   Paul A. Gilje, coordinator, 952-890-5220.

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