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 Response Page - Misukanis / Kosel  Interview -      
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These comments are responses to the statements listed below,
which were generated in regard to the
Katie Misukanis / Tom Kosel  Interview of
06-06-2014.
 

Kathleen Misukanis & Tom Kosel of the Minnesota Career College Association

OVERVIEW

According to Tom Kosel of Globe University and Katie Misukanis of Rasmussen College, both active in the Minnesota Career College Association (MCCA), for-profit (proprietary) higher education institutions serve students who haven't found success elsewhere and are often those students' "last hope." The for-profit schools, whose focus is to train students for jobs, offer extensive support services and serve older students, with an average age of 27, who are coming back to school to be retrained. Fourteen for-profit postsecondary companies, with 36 campuses in Minnesota, are part of the MCCA. There are 30,000 students statewide in the for-profit higher education sector, most of whom (63 percent) get associate degrees. A higher percentage of students at for-profit schools take out loans and, on average, their cumulative debt when they finish school is higher than in the public and nonprofit institutions.

Kosel says the for-profit sector offers competition to public-sector higher education institutions. He said for-profit schools have had extensive student support services all along and were among the first to offer students hybrid courses, which combine online work with on-campus classes that meet once a week. Public sector schools have since picked up a lot of these things, he notes. Misukanis maintains that proprietary schools can adapt more quickly to changes in the job market by sunsetting programs where there is little job demand and adding new programs with good job prospects.

Kosel and Misukanis call proprietary colleges and universities "educational businesses" and recognize that not everybody accepts the concept of making a profit in education. They point out that for-profits are left out of high school college and career centers and are rarely recommended by high school counselors or state workforce centers. They are also excluded from the state's Postsecondary Enrollment Options program (PSEO), which allows high school students, at no cost, to enroll in public and nonprofit postsecondary schools and earn both high school and college credit.

For the complete interview summary see: Misukanis Kosel interview

Response Summary: Average response ratings shown below are simply the mean of all readers’ zero-to-ten responses to the ideas proposed and should not be considered an accurate reflection of a scientifically structured poll.

To assist the Civic Caucus in planning upcoming interviews, readers rated these statements about the topic on a scale of 0 (strongly disagree) to 5 (neutral) to 10 (strongly agree): 

1. Topic is of value. (7.6 average response) The interview summarized today provides valuable information or insight.

2. Further study warranted. (4.7 average response) It would be helpful to schedule additional interviews on this topic.

Readers rated the following points discussed during the meeting on a scale of 0 (strongly disagree) to 5 (neutral) to 10 (strongly agree): 

3. For-profit schools offer valued training. (7.5 average response) For-profit career and trade schools are significant assets for Minnesota because they offer training that can be immediately applied to specific jobs.

4. Treat postsecondary providers equally. (7.4 average response) State laws should treat for-profit, nonprofit and state government postsecondary education institutions even-handedly, without favoritism toward or discrimination against one system relative to others.

5. For-profit faculty work in fields taught. (8.1 average response) A particular strength of for-profit career and trade schools is that most faculty members are currently employed in the very fields they are teaching.

6. Include for-profit schools in PSEO. (5.7 average response) Minnesota’s Postsecondary Enrollment Options program (PSEO)should allow high school students to enroll in postsecondary classes offered not only by nonprofit and state government education systems, but also by for-profit career and trade schools.

Response Distribution:

Strongly disagree

Moderately disagree

Neutral

Moderately agree

Strongly agree

Total Responses

1. Topic is of value.

0%

9%

9%

55%

27%

11

2. Further study warranted.

9%

18%

45%

27%

0%

11

3. For-profit schools offer valued training.

0%

9%

9%

55%

27%

11

4. Treat postsecondary providers equally.

18%

0%

9%

18%

55%

11

5. For-profit faculty work in fields taught.

0%

0%

18%

36%

45%

11

6. Include for-profit schools in PSEO.

18%

9%

27%

18%

27%

11

Individual Responses:

Ray Ayotte (7.5) (2.5) (10) (10) (10) (10)

Dave Broden (7.5) (5) (5) (10) (7.5) (7.5)

1. Topic is of value. Filled a gap in types of education [reviewed].

2. Further study warranted. Basic information is what was needed.

3. For-profit schools offer valued training. Certainly applies to some case but likely not in general.

4. Treat postsecondary providers equally. Competition is beneficial if uniform standards apply.

5. For-profit faculty work in fields taught. Valid if the faculty member is current in the approach and [in the] technology being taught and has a vision and understanding of the future.

6. Include for-profit schools in PSEO. With appropriate standards.

Scott Halstead (2.5) (0) (7.5) (0) (5) (0)

Susan Casserly (10) (7.5) (10) (10) (10) (5)

2. Further study warranted. Didn't get to the issue of transfer of credits. MnSCU colleges refuse to accept even identical classes, results from identical tests, i.e., AccuPlacer, etc., from any for-profit sector school, creating chaos for students who might want to transfer back into a public subsidy institution.

6. Include for-profit schools in PSEO. Not a fan of PSEO, I think the high schools should offer more challenging classes, and keep the college/post-secondary bound students on their campuses serving as role models and leaders to younger students. However if PSEO is an option, then students should be able to take classes at the school of their choice including for-profit sector schools .

David Dillon (10) (5) (10) (10) (10) (10)

4. Treat postsecondary providers equally. Of course it should, competition is a wonderful thing for the consumer and results in all kinds of positive outcomes. Look for the disingenuous arguments from those who don't want to compete. (And who could blame them?)

Don Anderson (5) (5) (7.5) (7.5) (5) (2.5)

Kevin Edberg (7.5) (2.5) (2.5) (0) (7.5) (0)

3. For-profit schools offer valued training. That hasn't been the experience of individuals in my circle of family and friends.

4. Treat postsecondary providers equally. Count me as one of those who don't buy into the notion, and who has not been persuaded by the experience of those in and graduated from the for-profit system.

Chuck Lutz (8) (7) (9) (9) (10) (8)

Paul Hauge (8) (7) (6) (5) (7) (5)

Bright Dornblaser (10) (5) (7) (10) (7) (5)

Tom Spitznagle (8) (5) (8) (10) (10) (10)

    

The Civic Caucus   is a non-partisan, tax-exempt educational organization.   The Interview Group  includes persons of varying political persuasions,
reflecting years of leadership in politics and business. Click here  to see a short personal background of each.

  John S. Adams, David Broden, Audrey Clay, Janis Clay, Pat Davies, Bill Frenzel, Paul Gilje (coordinator), Randy Johnson, Sallie Kemper, Ted Kolderie, Dan Loritz (chair),
Tim McDonald, Bruce Mooty, John Mooty, Jim Olson, Paul Ostrow, Wayne Popham, Dana Schroeder, Clarence Shallbetter, and Fred Zimmerman


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The Civic Caucus, 01-01-2008
2104 Girard Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55405.  civiccaucus@comcast.net
Dan Loritz, chair, 612-791-1919   ~   Paul A. Gilje, coordinator, 952-890-5220.

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